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School of Music

School of Music Mission Statement

The Salem College School of Music focuses on developing the whole musician. Building on a centuries-old legacy of excellence, it offers a healthful, stimulating environment in which a diverse student body obtains a unique blend of outstanding professional and liberal arts training. Through rigorous, nurturing and personalized instruction, students are empowered to develop their unique talents to the fullest potential and to prepare themselves for the next step in their musical journey—graduate school, professional internships, international study, teaching and performing careers, or community leadership in the arts.

The School of Music also provides cultural leadership and educational opportunities for Salem Academy and College and for Winston-Salem and its surrounding areas. Through free concerts, workshops, audience building, and general music education, the School of Music seeks to contribute to the cultural vitality of our region and to secure a healthy future for the study and performance of music.

Your Program

Music 4-Year Plan
Salem's personalized instruction means you leave the School of Music with a strong background in both theory and performance. Your portfolio will be a professional one that is unique to your own talents and career goals. Your advisors are mentors, coaches and outstanding teachers, giving you the tools you need for the world of music as well as an incredible network of contacts and support. 

Your Experience

The School of Music also provides cultural leadership and educational opportunities for Salem Academy and College and for Winston-Salem and the surrounding area. Through concerts, workshops, audience-building and general music education, the School of Music seeks to contribute to the cultural vitality of our region and to secure a healthy future for the study and performance of music.

Salem places a great deal of emphasis on learning outside the classroom, in real-world settings. Internships are an important part of that process. An internship offers you the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills learned in class and to explore career possibilities. Internships in music may include studio teaching, Suzuki teaching, church music, or work with performing organizations. You will also be required to take a course in not-for-profit management in order to prepare you for the real-life challenges of competition.

Your Results

The quality of a music degree is determined by what doors it opens for advanced study and career opportunities. When you graduate with a major or minor in music, you will be prepared to continue your music studies at the best graduate schools or go on to teach music in an educational setting; perform onstage; join orchestras or ensembles; and other career paths.

Salem College offers programs of study that meet the most rigorous accreditation standards of instruction as set by the National Association of Schools of Music, while meeting your needs, interests and career goals. 

The B.A. Degree

 A B.A. (Bachelor of Arts) in music is available in a general concentration in music only. You will be taking required courses in music theory, aural skills and music history; applied music for majors; senior seminar in music; and introduction to arts management or the arts in the community in addition to electives. 

The B.M. Degree

You may earn a Bachelor of Music degree in Performance with a concentration in flute, guitar, organ, piano or voice. You must complete the following at Salem: two years of applied music, one year of ensemble, one advanced course in music theory, one course in music history, one course in music pedagogy, one music literature course and Senior Seminar (MUSI 390).

Minors in Music

Salem offers both the minor in music and the minor in music theatre. When you choose to minor in music, you will take courses such as music theory, aural skills, music history and applied music for non-majors. When you choose to minor in music theatre, you are required to take music theory and aural skills, The Musical in America, acting, applied voice for non-majors and musical theater. 

Additional Areas of Study in Music

Non-Major Classes

For those of you who are interested in studying music, but do not plan to become music majors, there is a range of courses that fulfill the basic distribution requirement in the Fine Arts. These include Women in Music, American Musical Theater, Fundamentals of Music and Introduction to Music of the World.

Individual Lessons

Music lessons in flute, organ, piano and voice, as well as the standard orchestral instruments and guitar, are available to both music majors and non-music majors.

  • Alexander Technique - The Alexander Technique teaches instrumentalists and singers to identify and prevent unnecessary patterns of tension during practice and performance. Salem was one of the first schools in the United States to teach this approach.
  • Arts Management - Music students are highly encouraged to study arts management, offered through a separate department at Salem College.
  • Women in Music - Salem has been an innovative leader in the musical education of women. A course entitled "Women in Music" explores the contributions and roles of women in music as performers, teachers, conductors and patrons.
  • Community Music School at Salem College (CMS) - The CMS offers private instruction in music to children and adults. Through the Early Childhood Music program, Salem offers music instruction to very young children, from infants through age 7. Music majors have the benefit of observing and participating in Community Music School programs as part of their training.  

Music Entrepreneurship Minor

A minor in Music Entrepreneurship provides students an opportunity to assess options and prepare for pursuing a life in the arts. Students completing the minors will study contemporary “arts delivery systems” and established freelance opportunities for artists. In addition, they will be introduced to emerging non-traditional roles of the arts and professional artists along with structural options through which creative enterprise can be carried out.

You will be among a group of motivated young women who—through fieldwork, group work, and individual presentations—find their own voice. You may travel to New York, Washington D.C., Boston, even Germany, to apply what you learn in real-world settings. You will gain a deep understanding of the field you may one day manage through required courses in visual or performing arts, as well as involvement in theatre, dance, music, and studio arts events and activities both on and off campus.

Professors in the program are interdisciplinary thinkers who care deeply for their students and seek to make the arts a vital part of every person’s life. They are widely recognized experts in the field, and have helped distinguish Salem’s program through a collective belief that arts management is a discipline unto itself, as opposed to other schools that fail to truly integrate arts courses and business courses.

Music Courses (MUSI)

MUSI 010. Keyboard Class for Non-Music Majors One-quarter course

This beginning-level course provides an introduction to the keyboard.  Students will learn to identify notes on the grand staff, develop a solid well-coordinated technical foundation for future growth, play a variety of left-hand accompaniment patterns, demonstrate basic rhythm patterns and perform elementary-level solos and ensemble repertoire.  Students will also be introduced to computer software programs that allow for recording, editing and producing creative music projects.  Fall and Spring.

MUSI 011. Keyboard Musicianship I One-quarter course

For music majors with little or no prior keyboard experience, this course instills a basic technical foundation to playing the piano, while building the skills of becoming a functional musician.  Class activities include repertoire, harmonization, transposition, applied music theory, playing by ear, ensemble playing and improvisation.  The digital keyboard lab introduces students to some of the uses of MIDI technology.  Normally taken in conjunction with MUSI 161 and 171.  Fall.

MUSI 012. Keyboard Musicianship II One-quarter course

A continuation of the four-semester Keyboard Musicianship sequence.  Students further develop their reading fluency and technical skills.  Application of music theory concepts continues to guide the student in demonstrating a musical approach to these concepts.  Class activities include repertoire, harmonization, transposition, applied music theory, playing by ear, ensemble playing, improvisation and accompanying.  Students learn to play all major and harmonic minor scales (two octaves, hands alone) and all major and minor arpeggios (two octaves, hands alone). Spring.

MUSI 013. Keyboard Musicianship III One-quarter course

A continuation of the four-semester Keyboard Musicianship sequence.  Students further develop their reading fluency and technical skills.  Class activities include repertoire, harmonization, transposition, applied music theory, playing by ear, ensemble playing, improvisation and accompanying.  Students begin transposing instrumental parts and learning skills for score reading at the keyboard.  Scales and arpeggios are reinforced (hands alone). Fall.

MUSI 014. Keyboard Musicianship IV One-quarter course

A continuation of the four-semester Keyboard Musicianship sequence.  Students further develop their reading fluency and technical skills.  Class activities include repertoire, harmonization, transposition, applied music theory, playing by ear, ensemble playing, improvisation and accompanying.  Students will prepare for the Piano Proficiency Exam administered at the end of this semester by the music faculty.  Spring.

MUSI 015. Class Voice One-quarter course

An introduction to basic vocal technique intended primarily for non-voice and beginning voice majors. Fall and Spring.

MUSI 021. Applied Piano for Non-Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is not piano, or for music minors, or for non-majors taking lessons for enrichment, individual piano instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 022. Applied Piano for Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is piano, individual piano instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 023. Applied Piano for Majors (Intensive) One three-quarter course

For bachelor of music majors whose concentration is piano or injury-preventive keyboard technique certificate students, individual piano instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 024. Applied Organ for Non-Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is not organ, or for music minors, or for non-majors taking lessons for enrichment, individual organ instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 025. Applied Organ for Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is organ, individual organ instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 026. Applied Organ for Majors (Intensive) One three-quarter course

For bachelor of music majors whose concentration is organ, individual organ instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 027. Applied Voice for Non-Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is not voice, or for music minors, or for non-majors taking lessons for enrichment, individual voice instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 028. Applied Voice for Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is voice, individual voice instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 029. Applied Voice for Majors (Intensive) One three-quarter course

For bachelor of music majors whose concentration is voice, individual voice instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 037. Applied Flute for Non-Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is not flute, or for music minors, or for non-majors taking lessons for enrichment, individual flute instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 038. Applied Flute for Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is flute, individual flute instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 039. Applied Flute for Majors (Intensive) One three-quarter course

For bachelor of music majors whose concentration is flute, individual flute instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 041. Applied Strings for Non-Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is not strings, or for music minors, or for non-majors taking lessons for enrichment, individual strings instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.  The specific instrument is indicated in the section title.

MUSI 043. Applied Strings for Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is strings, individual strings instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.  The specific instrument is indicated in the section title.

MUSI 044. Applied Winds for Non-Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is not a wind instrument (other than flute), or for music minors, or for non-majors taking lessons for enrichment, a half-hour of individual wind instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.  The specific instrument is indicated in the section title.

MUSI 046. Applied Winds for Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is a wind instrument (other than flute), individual wind instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.  The specific instrument is indicated in the section title.

MUSI 047. Applied Guitar for Non-Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is not guitar, or for music minors, or for non-majors taking lessons for enrichment, individual guitar instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 048. Applied Guitar for Majors One-quarter course

For music majors whose concentration is guitar, individual guitar instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 049. Applied Guitar for Majors (Intensive) One three-quarter course

For bachelor of music majors whose concentration is guitar, individual guitar instruction, plus a one-hour studio class.

MUSI 050. Salem College Chorale One-quarter course

A women’s ensemble open to all members of the Salem College community. Emphasis on developing good choral ensemble skills and building vocal technique. Audition required.

MUSI 051. Salem College Chamber Choir One-quarter course

An ensemble dedicated to highly polished performances of the finest repertory for women’s voices. Audition required.

MUSI 052. Symphony Chorale One-quarter course

Participation in the Winston-Salem Symphony Chorale. Experience in performing works for chorus and orchestra.

MUSI 053. Piano Ensemble One-quarter course

Study of the four-hand literature for one and two pianos.

MUSI 054. Orchestra One-quarter course

Performance of literature for larger instrumental ensemble.

MUSI 055. Chamber Music Ensemble One-quarter course

Performance of chamber music from the standard repertory.

MUSI 056. Jazz Voices One-quarter course

This a cappella choral group is open to members of the Chamber Choir and Chorale by audition. Public performances on campus and at other locations will be scheduled each semester. Membership is diverse and draws from all majors. The repertoire includes vocal jazz, college a cappella, pop and swing choral literature.

MUSI 103. The Musical in America One course

The development of the musical from its European origins to its uniquely American character. Open to non-majors.

MUSI 105. Women in Music One course

An exploration of the contributions and roles of women in music as performers, teachers, conductors and patrons over the history of Western civilization. Underlying psychological, neurological, historical and sociological patterns that affect women’s productivity positively or negatively will be examined. Videos, sound recordings, concerts, guest lectures, interviews and field trips will enhance appreciation of women in today’s world in all genres of music, including popular, country, classical, jazz and new age. No prerequisites; open to non-majors.

MUSI 107. Introduction to Music of the World One course

This course presents an introduction to the relationship between music and the culture in which it originates. It will focus on music from traditions outside of Western Europe. Through the study of selected cultures, students will develop an understanding of how culture influences the sound as well as the uses of a society’s music. In addition, they will gain an appreciation of that culture’s music.

MUSI 111. Fundamentals of Music One course

This course will provide an introduction to basic principles of music including pitch, rhythmic notation, key signatures and fundamental chord relationships. Tools include computer programs in tandem with a MIDI keyboard. No prerequisites. Open to non-majors.

MUSI 116. Injury-Preventive, Well-Coordinated Keyboard Technique One-half or one course

This course is designed to give the keyboard major practical and theoretical knowledge of the fundamentals of a holistic, healthful technique. It addresses biomechanics, keyboard mechanics, wellness and instructions in the fundamentals of healthful sound production through the Lister-Sink Method. Students apply principles of injury-preventive technique to basic keyboard exercises, studies and graduated repertoire. Instruction includes a beginning week of intensive daily workshops, followed by a weekly group and private lessons, as well as guest lectures. It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with MUSI 223 (Alexander Technique).

MUSI 117. Making Sense of Music – Listening with 21st Century Ears One course

This course will explore elements, forms and styles of music from a variety of traditions, including western classical, popular music and world music.  Prior music training is not required. 

MUSI 118. Music History I One course

The first part of the course presents an overview of music history and literature, surveying the main stylistic trends from early music to the present.  Then the course begins a more in-depth study of music, musical styles, and the forces that influence them, beginning with the ancient world and continuing to the early Baroque. Prerequisite: MUSI 162.  Fall.

MUSI 150. Musical Theater One-quarter course

The basic techniques of singing and their applications to musical theater repertoire and performance. Participation in musical production. May be repeated for credit. Fall and Spring.

MUSI 151. Acting One course

The fundamentals of acting, e.g., improvisation, scene and character preparation, concentration development as a means of facilitating creativity and spontaneity in the medium of musical theater. Spring.

MUSI 161. Music Theory I Three-quarter course

This course introduces the student to music theory, a subject that comprises the musical materials and procedures of the Common Practice period.  It addresses aspects of melody, harmony, texture, rhythm, form, musical analysis, elementary composition, and to some extent, history and style. The student's ability to read and write musical notation is fundamental to such a course. It is also assumed that the student has acquired (or is acquiring) at least basic performance skills in voice or on an instrument.  Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 171 unless exception approved by the instructor. Fall.

MUSI 162. Music Theory II Three-quarter course

This course continues the process of the student learning the principles of voice leading, part writing, harmonic progression and sequence, form and non-chord tones.  Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 172 unless exception approved by the instructor.   Prerequisite: MUSI 161. Spring.

MUSI 171. Aural Skills I One-quarter course

Musicianship skills such as dictation and other listening skills, sight-singing, rhythm reading, interval identification, scales, chord identification and keyboard harmony are considered an important part of the theory course.  This class will help to develop these skills. Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 161 unless exception approved by the instructor. Fall.

MUSI 172. Aural Skills II One-quarter course

This course will help the student continue the development of musicianship skills in the student. Sight-singing, rhythm reading, listening skills will be continued and more dictation will be stressed. Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 162 unless exception approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: MUSI 171. Spring.

MUSI 173. Aural Skills III One-quarter course

This course will help the student continue the development of musicianship skills in the student. Sight-singing, rhythm reading, listening skills will be continued and more dictation will be stressed.   Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 213 unless exception approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: MUSI 172. Fall.

MUSI 174. Aural Skills IV One-quarter course

This course will help the student develop the skills to demonstrate improved ability to sing at sight, to perform musical dictation and write compositions.  Sight-singing, rhythm reading and listening skills will be continued.  Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 214 unless exception approved by the instructor. This course is the final course for students preparing for the second-year sight-singing proficiency exam. Prerequisite: MUSI 173. Spring.

MUSI 200. Independent Study in Music One-half to two courses

Independent study under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Open to students with a 2.0 cumulative average and permission of the director of the School of Music. Independent study may take the form of readings, research, conference, project and/or field experience. Independent study may be taken for a total of four courses, no more than two in any term.

MUSI 213. Music Theory III   Three-quarter course

This course continues the process of the student learning secondary functions, modulations, forms, modes, the Neapolitan chord and Augmented sixth chords. Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 173 unless exception approved by the instructor.  Prerequisite: MUSI 162. Fall.

MUSI 214. Music Theory IV   Three-quarter course

This course continues the process of the student learning Twentieth century music and the materials and techniques of that period.  Post-tonal theory will be introduced and techniques such as minimalism, indeterminacy, electronic and computer music, twelve-tone serialism, and integral serialism will be discussed. Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 174 unless exception approved by the instructor.  Prerequisite: MUSI 213. Spring.

MUSI 216. Pedagogy of Injury-Preventive, Well-Coordinated Keyboard Technique One course

This course examines the components of sound pedagogy while emphasizing the most effective means of teaching injury-preventive on the elementary and intermediate levels through the Lister-Sink Method. Instruction includes lectures on methodology, educational psychology, learning styles, lesson planning, studio set-up and video analysis. Students complete 10 weeks of student teaching. Prerequisite: MUSI 116.

MUSI 217. Music History II One course

Continuing studies of music history, beginning around 1600 and continuing through 1800.

Prerequisites: MUSI 118 and MUSI 213.  Spring.

MUSI 218. Music History III One course

Continuing studies of music history, from 1800 to the present. Prerequisite: MUSI 217. Spring.

MUSI 223. Alexander Technique One-quarter course

The Alexander Technique teaches instrumentalists and singers to identify and prevent unnecessary patterns of tension during practice and performance.  Study of the technique improves coordination, promotes ease and freedom of movement and helps the musician avoid strain and injury.  Pass/no credit grading.  May be repeated for credit.

MUSI 225. Special Topics in Music One-quarter to one course

An investigation of a topic of importance to the contemporary musician. The specific course content will vary in response to new developments in music—either in technology, research or practice. Prerequisites are announced prior to registration and listed in the course schedule.

MUSI 226. Keyboardists’ Injuries: Causes and Cures One course

The objectives of this course are to identify and study in depth the injuries that afflict keyboardists; to study history and present state of the field of music medicine; to study current mainstream medical and complementary approaches to healing; and to develop a common language to bridge the music and medical worlds. This course will equip more fully the future teacher not only to teach injury-preventive technique but also to be able to help guide the injured keyboardist to the appropriate health-care professionals, and then to be a partner in the rehabilitation and retraining process.

MUSI 230. Music of a Genius or Genre One course

Either the works of a single composer will be studied to appreciate his/her unique place in history or a specific genre by various composers will be examined. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

MUSI 231. Piano Literature One course

A survey of piano literature, and its forerunners, from the Baroque period to the present. Includes the development of the piano; analyses of significant keyboard works; and an examination of recordings of distinguished historic performers of the 20th century. Prerequisite: MUSI 218.

MUSI 232. Vocal Literature One course

An examination of primarily secular song literature from the 17th through the early 20th centuries, with an emphasis on the German Lied of the 19th and early 20th century and the French Melodie of the same period. Emphasis on performance styles and on the great singers. Prerequisite: MUSI 218. Spring, alternate years.

MUSI 235. Organ Literature One-half to one course

Principles of organ design and construction, and the history of the development of the organ. A survey of organ literature from the Robertsbridge Codex (1325) to present composition; includes research and performance projects focusing on the performance practices of each period.  Normally offered across two semesters, totaling one course.  Prerequisite: MUSI 218.

MUSI 237. Flute Literature One course

This course will offer a survey of the literature of the flute and piccolo in orchestral, chamber music and solo repertory. It will also explore the evolution of the flute from ancient to modern times. Prerequisite: MUSI 218.

MUSI 238. Orchestral Excerpts for Flute One-quarter course

This course will examine flute and piccolo excerpts from the standard orchestral literature, highlighting audition materials of the major symphony orchestras. Students will be coached on how to prepare excerpts and will participate in a mock audition with feedback. This course will also address all aspects of successful auditions and the expectations demanded of them in a professional orchestra. Prerequisites: Senior standing or permission of instructor.

MUSI 239. Guitar Literature One-half to one course

An historical and stylistic survey of literature for guitar, lute and vihuela from the sixteenth century to modern times. Major composers, genres, readings and specific works from each style period will be examined in regard to performance practice, listening and analysis. Short works will be assigned for mid-term performance projects. Normally offered across two semesters, totaling one course.  Prerequisite: MUSI 218.

MUSI 241. Composition One-half course

Studies of the craft of contemporary composition; original written work. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: MUSI 212. Fall and Spring.

MUSI 242. Diction One-half to one course

The basics of the International Phonetic Alphabet and rules for pronunciation in English, Italian, French, German, and Spanish. Normally offered across two semesters.  Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. Fall, alternate years.

MUSI 243. Piano Sight Reading One-quarter course

A practical method of building and refining sight reading skills for use in accompanying and chamber music. Fall, alternate years.

MUSI 244. The Art of Accompanying  One-quarter course

Study and application of the principles of vocal and instrumental accompanying. Prerequisite: MUSI 243 or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years.

MUSI 245. Sacred Music Skills One-quarter to one-half course

Emphasis on skills necessary to become a successful church musician. Improvisation will be an integral part of the course each semester. Topics covered include hymnology, liturgy and worship styles, creative hymn-playing, accompanying, sight-reading, transposition, conducting from the console, rehearsal techniques and church music administration. Prerequisite: MUSI 214.

MUSI 247. Intermediate Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation One-quarter course

A thorough exploration of keyboard skills, including simple harmonic progressions and figured bass, harmonization, modulation, transposition, an introduction to reading open scores and C clefs, as well as the development of rudimentary skills in improvisation. Prerequisites: MUSI 213, two semesters of applied piano. Required of all piano and organ majors (B.A. or B. M); open to others based on demonstrated ability. Fall.

MUSI 248. Advanced Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation One-quarter course

A continuation of MUSI 247, with more emphasis on advanced harmonic progression, figured bass and continuo playing, harmonization, modulation, transposition, reading open scores and C clefs, as well as the development of more refined skills in improvisation. Prerequisite: MUSI 247. Required of all piano and organ majors (B.A. and B.M.); open to others who demonstrate exceptional ability at the keyboard. Spring.

MUSI 255. Piano Pedagogy One-half to one course

The purpose of this course is to define the characteristics of sound pedagogy through lectures, reading assignments, and observation of teaching; to survey and assess teaching methods; and to acquire foundational pedagogical skills through student teaching.  Normally taught across two semesters.  Students complete 10 weeks of student teaching. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

MUSI 256. Vocal Pedagogy One course

The purpose of this course is to develop a working (anatomical and physiological) knowledge of the human voice and an understanding of healthful vocal technique. Also includes the practical application of this knowledge to teaching voice.  Students complete 10 weeks of student teaching. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

MUSI 257. Organ Pedagogy One course

Students will review, examine, and evaluate pedagogical materials and methods sources, and explore teaching techniques to develop a working knowledge of the instructional literature. Supervised applied teaching will be a significant part of the course. Students complete 10 weeks of student teaching. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

MUSI 258. Flute Pedagogy One course

This course will explore topics related to the development and understanding of flute pedagogy as well as extra-musical considerations involved in being a successful educator.  Topics may include but are not limited to: understanding the mechanics of the instrument, care and minor repair of the instrument, tone development, playing position, fingerings and technique, pitch tendencies, musical styles, recognizing a student’s strengths and weaknesses, problem solving, recital programming, studio development and recruiting. Students complete 10 weeks of student teaching. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

MUSI 259. Guitar Pedagogy One course

In this course, students will develop an overview of the major pedagogical methods and instructional literature, including the historical evolution of guitar teaching. An emphasis is placed on the application of pedagogical theory to real-world teaching situations. Students will complete 10 weeks of student teaching. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

MUSI 263. Instrumental Techniques: Brass/Percussion One-half course

This course will focus on developing familiarity with the brass and percussion instrument families, as well as learning basic skills on the instruments sufficient to demonstrate and teach at beginning levels of proficiency. Students will also develop skills of transposition for instruments and the ability to perform simple instrument repairs.

MUSI 265. Instrumental Techniques: Strings/Woodwinds One-half course

This course will focus on developing familiarity with the string and woodwind instrument families, as well as learning basic skills on the instruments sufficient to demonstrate and teach at beginning levels of proficiency. Students will also develop skills of transposition for instruments and the ability to perform simple instrument repairs.

MUSI 270. Internship in Music One course

An opportunity to apply knowledge and skills that the student has learned in coursework in a real work setting, the music internship provides the music major with an opportunity to experience career possibilities in music in off-campus and/or on-campus settings. Possible assignments may include studio teaching, Suzuki teaching, church music experience, experience with performing organizations, etc. Prerequisite: senior standing.

MUSI 285. Intermediate Recital No course credit

A half recital (one-half hour of music). This is one of two required recitals for bachelor of music students. Recommended to be given in the spring of sophomore year. Bachelor of arts degree students who give a senior recital must sign up for this course. Coursework includes preparation of all music for the recital and preparation of program materials. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUSI 290. Honors Independent Study in Music One course

Open to juniors and seniors with a 3.5 average in music; subject to the approval of the director the School of Music. Honors work may be taken for a total of no more than two courses.

MUSI 303. The Musical in America One course 

A course for bachelor of music students offered concurrently with MUSI 103 (see MUSI 103 for a complete description). Students enrolled in MUSI 303 will do additional research and presentations on a level suitable for an upper division course in the Bachelor of Music.

MUSI 304. Injury-Preventive, Well-Coordinated Keyboard Technique One-half to one course 

This course is designed to give the keyboard major practical and theoretical knowledge of the fundamentals of a holistic, healthful technique. It addresses biomechanics, keyboard mechanics, wellness and instruction in the fundamentals of healthful sound production through the Lister-Sink Method.  Students apply principles of injury-preventive technique to basic keyboard exercises, studies and graduated repertoire. Instruction includes a beginning week of intensive daily workshops, followed by a weekly group and private lesson, as well as guest lectures. It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with MUSI 223 (Alexander Technique). MUSI 304 is designed for post-baccalaureate students enrolled in the Professional Certificate Program and is offered concurrently with MUSI 116. Students enrolled in MUSI 304 will do additional research and presentations on a level suitable for an upper division course in the Bachelor of Music.

MUSI 305. Women in Music One course

A course for Bachelor of Music students offered concurrently with MUSI 105 (see MUSI 105 for a complete description). Students enrolled in MUSI 305 will do additional research and presentations on a level suitable for an upper division course in the Bachelor of Music.

MUSI 307. Introduction to Music of the World One course

A course for Bachelor of Music students offered concurrently with MUSI 107 (see MUSI 107 for a complete description). Students enrolled in MUSI 307 will do additional research and presentations on a level suitable for an upper division course in the Bachelor of Music.

MUSI 316. Music Technology One course

A survey of digital tools and equipment used in making music.  Areas of science (acoustics), aesthetics, and the history of sound production and reproduction will contextualize the course.  Following this introduction, a hands-on approach to using some of these tools of digital technology will take place in the new Salem College Audio Studio.  Creative projects include work with MIDI synthesizers, sequencers, and microphones.  Music teachers, performers, composers, and arrangers will learn practical ways of using technology to communicate, educate, and entertain. Prerequisite: Students must have passed the Keyboard Proficiency Exam or have permission from the instructor.

MUSI 317. Form and Analysis One course

Structural principles in music of various periods analyzing music from folk songs to symphonies. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing structural form by sight and by ear. Prerequisite: MUSI 214.

MUSI 318. Counterpoint One course

An introduction to 16th Century (modal) and 18th Century (tonal) counterpoint. Representative works will be analyzed, primarily 16th Century sacred repertoire and Bach two-part inventions. Composing in each style will also be part of the course.

Prerequisite: MUSI 214.

MUSI 322. Arranging and Orchestration One-half course

Instruction includes arranging and adapting music for various ensembles from a variety of sources to meet the needs and ability levels of school performing groups and classroom situations, including arranging for instruments. Prerequisite: MUSI 213.

MUSI 330. Conducting and Rehearsal Techniques One-half to one course

The primary focus is the development of the psychomotor skills needed for clear and expressive conducting, plus the study of and experience in basic conducting techniques. Problem solving and decision-making are emphasized with regard to tempo, dynamics, performer’s ability, difficulty of music, instrumentation, balance, blend, pitch, rhythmic accuracy, and score reading.  Prerequisite: MUSI 162 or permission of instructor.

MUSI 331. Advanced Conducting and Rehearsal Techniques One-half course

Students will demonstrate a continued development of the conducting skills already acquired through concentrating on various historical and generic styles.  The conductor will communicate those styles through appropriate gestures and immediate imagery. Rehearsal procedures, score preparation, and baton technique will be emphasized. The student will explore literature of all genres, but choral works will dominate. Prerequisite: MUSI 330.

MUSI 385. Advanced Recital No course credit

A full recital (50-60 minutes of music). This is the second of two required recitals for bachelor of music degree students. Normally given in the senior year. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUSI 390. Senior Seminar One-half course

The purpose of this capstone course is two-fold: First, to synthesize the various aspects of musical training—music history, theory and performance--in performance, critical listening, and written critiquing. Second, to explore components of creative entrepreneurship in preparation for entering the music profession. 

In the voices of Salem School of Music graduates: 

“My three years at Salem gave me opportunities to study with renowned music instructors and to perform, learn, and grow musically in a caring environment.  As an injured organist, Salem College provided the only means by which I could recover and return to a playing career. Through the expertise, knowledge, and personalized teaching at Salem, I received an excellent education along with the tools to create success in a music career.” 

Brent Neuenschwander, ‘12 (B.M., Organ); M.M. (Organ Performance) Student, UNC-School of the Arts

“I did not just learn more about music; I learned more about myself. The one-on-one attention I received from my professors helped me connect with my art and transition from a student to a musician.”
Jennifer Rodda Anderson, ‘08 (B.M., Voice)

“The opportunity to study with internationally acclaimed faculty at the oldest existing institution dedicated to the education of females was a remarkable one. As an organ student, I had the unique opportunity to study on historically significant instruments at Salem, in Old Salem, and the surrounding areas. My education in the Salem College School of Music did more than develop my skills as a performer and an educator, it instilled in me a passion for life-long learning.”
Kimberly Nicole Herring, ‘07 (B.M., Music Education); M.A. (Liberal Studies), Wake Forest University; Ph.D. (Education Leadership/Higher Education) student, East Carolina University

“As a university professor, orchestral and chamber musician, and flute recitalist, I strongly believe that my personalized musical experience lead me directly to the musical path that I am on today. In addition to the thorough music curriculum, I was able to work one-on-one with all of my professors at Salem to identify the personal and musical needs that would help me to accomplish my goals.”
Laura Dangerfield Stevens ’02 (B.M., Flute); M.M., (Flute Performance), UNC-School of the Arts

“My music education at Salem prepared me for graduate school at Westminster Choir College and helped me place out of remedial courses there. I am a currently a full-time church musician, and I owe a large part of that to my musical growth at Salem.”
Christin Barnhardt ’02 (B.A., Music); M.M. (Piano), Westminster Choir College; M.M. (Sacred Music), Westminster Choir College

“Salem gave me a wonderful foundation musically…and prepared me well for graduate study at Indiana University.”
Rebecca Miller Saunders C’90 (BM voice); soloist, Carolina Pro Musica 

“Studying organ performance with world-renowned music professors at Salem gave me the theoretical, compositional, and performance skills necessary to be an organist for a large Moravian church with a thriving music program. The individualized instruction that the small classes provided allowed me to build relationships with the music faculty that remain strong today.”
Montine Wilkinson ’84 (B.A., Mathematics), ’85 (B.A., Music Ed); M.M. (Organ Performance), University of Oregon

“My education and musical experiences were first-rate. My teachers were wonderful and inspiring, and my fellow students added very much to the complete experience.” 
Patricia Barnes Griffith ‘72 (B.M., Piano); M.M., D.M.A., Peabody Conservatory; Professor of Piano, Kentucky State University

“It was a very special time for growth in the musical arts as well as personal growth through new experiences and friendships.”
Lynn Messick C’69 (BM piano); Music Director, School of Dance, UNC-School of the Arts

“With total support and encouragement of the music faculty, I thought I could accomplish whatever I set out to do musically, as long as I worked hard... I am deeply grateful to the Salem College School of Music for setting me on the path that made me who I am today, an active musician, nationally and internationally.”
Frances Cuningham Nobert ‘59 (B.M., Organ, Piano); Professor Emerita of Music, Whittier College; Vice-President, Mader Corporation MM, Syracuse University; DMA, University of Southern California, Fulbright Scholar


“I was well prepared for graduate work. Better than most! The Salem faculty were very giving of their time, always encouraging, very thorough in teaching. It was a close relationship with faculty and students—a larger school couldn’t have had that special bond. After being away from piano for many years, I was able to have a career as a performing pianist and chamber musician because I had had such a strong foundation.”
Ella Ann Lee Holding ’56 (BM piano); MM, Yale University, Fulbright Scholar; Artist-in-Residence, Campbell University

“Salem College & Academy gave me the foundation, inspiration and mentoring to attain the goals I aspired to.”
Margaret Vardell Sandresky ‘42 (B.M. Organ); M.M. (composition), Eastman School of Music; Taught at Oberlin, University of Texas/Austin, UNC-School of the Arts (founded organ department); World-acclaimed composer and 2004 Distinguished AGO Composer of the Year 

 

Statement from Hearing Health Consultant

Hearing health and minimization of hearing loss will focus on individual education and good hearing health practices. An expert in hearing health will present a talk to the School of Music at the beginning of each school year. They will discuss anatomy of the ear and where hearing damage from noise can occur. Special emphasis will be given to steps an individual can take to protect hearing, such as the use of earplugs and not listening to music at a high volume. Proper insertion of ear plugs will be demonstrated and free ear plugs will be distributed at the talk.

Information will be provided about musician ear plugs and where they may be purchased. Finally, local resources for free hearing screenings will be given so that interested students may have their hearing monitored by a hearing health professional.

While hearing health primarily must rest with the individual, environmental treatments will be provided. All practice rooms have one wall that is acoustically treated, and some piano practice rooms have large area rugs that aid in sound absorption. Rugs will be purchased and installed for all practice rooms that routinely are used.

Students, please note: students are required to wear hearing protection while practicing in practice rooms on the Lower Level of the Elberson Fine Arts Center. Ear protection may be obtained from the FAC office.

Inclement Weather: Just a test

This is a quick site-wide alert test. It will auto-expire and disappear at 4pm, Dec 22, 2014

Mon Dec 22 17:00:00 EST 2014