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Salem Academy & College Archives

GRACE L. SIEWERS ARCHIVES ROOM Named in honor of Librarian Grace Louise Siewers (C '09), the Archives Room houses letters, personal papers, early library books and textbooks, photographs, yearbooks, newspapers, and other materials pertaining to the long history of Salem--as Girls' Boarding School, Female Academy, and finally as Academy and...

Mission Statement

The Salem Academy and College Archives is responsible for acquiring, managing, preserving and making accessible to the community as an educational resource, institutional materials and records of permanent historical value pertaining to the Academy and College.   The Archives collect administrative and fiscal records, manuscripts, photographs, maps, architectural plans, scrapbooks, and letters from presidents, academic departments, student organizations, faculty, students and alumnae that help document and illustrate the history, programs, events and goals of the institution.

 Sights & Insights      Salem Academy & College Catalog    Alumnae newsletters

Salem College's student yearbook, Sights and Insights, and the Salem Academy and College Catalogs are now available online thanks to the North Carolina Digital Heritage CenterYearbooks and catalogs (listed under "Campus Publications") representing 1905-2009 are  digitized and can be searched and viewed online.

Academy & College Photo Gallery

Academy & College Photo Gallery


Policy on Student Research

The Salem archives in Gramley Library houses documents, record books, photographs and publications that pertain to the history of Salem Academy and College.  Unlike the library’s circulating collections, the materials in the archives are neither fully cataloged nor organized for patron browsing or even for ready access.  Members of the library staff prepare and utilize a variety of in-house finding aids and they shelve the materials according to current preservation practices.   As is the case with most archives, access to the Salem materials depends upon the researcher’s ability to describe as precisely as possible the question being pursued

 

 

Authorized staff members use this information to identify and retrieve relevant material, deliver it to a designated area for supervised examination by the researcher, and (if appropriate) make any necessary copies.  Because this process requires substantial amounts of library staff time, it is important for would-be archival researchers first to have conducted adequate preliminary research on their topics using available resources.* *

A student who hopes to carry out research on some aspect of the history of Salem Academy and College will consult with a Salem reference librarian to identify any available information and with the faculty member who will award academic credit for the research project.   The student will draw up and present to the archivist a written research proposal, approved and signed by the faculty member, that (1) clearly describes the research question(s) to be pursued; (2) lists and discusses the preliminary research that has been done, demonstrating the need for further work using Salem archival resources; and (3) confirms that, at the same time the final project is submitted for a grade, the student will give a duplicate copy to the archives.


**   A key to identifying primary resources relevant to the first decades of the Salem Female Academy is Frances Griffin’s Less Time for Meddling A History of Salem Academy and College 1772 – 1866.  (Some of these resources are located in the Salem archives and many are located in the Archives of the Moravian Church, Southern Province.)  The optimal primary resource for this early period is Adelaide Fries’s multivolume Records of the Moravians in North Carolina, which are part of the library’s circulating collection.   Additional books include John Henry Clewell’s History of Wachovia in North Carolina and Adelaide Fries’s Historical Sketch of Salem Female Academy, both published in 1902. 

The extant copies of school catalogs (1854-2012), alumnae newspapers and bulletins (1878-1978) and college annuals (1905-2009) have been digitized and are available via links above.  These digitized materials are searchable, and the annuals contain many of the early images stored in the archival photograph files.

While most items in the Salem archives have not been cataloged, many are represented in the library’s online catalog and have both call numbers and assigned locations.    

 

GRACE L. SIEWERS ARCHIVES ROOM

archives-window-sceneGrace Siewers

Named in honor of Librarian Grace Louise Siewers (C '09), the Archives Room houses letters, personal papers, early library books and textbooks, photographs, yearbooks, newspapers, and other materials pertaining to the long history of Salem--as Girls' Boarding School, Female Academy, and finally as Academy and College. 

The Siewers Archives Room is accessible by appointment during regular weekday hours.  Contact Kay McKnight,  kay.mcknight@salem.edu

 

CLARENCE E. CLEWELL RARE BOOKS ROOM

The gift of Ruth Clewell ( A '28, C '34) in honor of her father, the Rare Books Room houses Salem's collections of rare and early imprint materials. Special collections include first editions of the works of Dr. Samuel Johnson and  James Boswell, Hogarth Press publications, and Southern women writers, as well as pamphlets and other materials pertaining to the nineteenth century slavery debate in the United States. 

The Clewell Rare Books Room is accessible by appointment during regular weekday hours.  Contact Elizabeth Novicki by email (elizabeth.novicki@salem.edu) or phone at (336) 917-5417.

 

Siewers Archives Scene