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Why a Women's College?

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Lauren Redman

Why you'll shine at Salem

Although women’s colleges educate only two percent of female college students, they have an uncanny ability to move women to greatness.

Women choose to attend women’s colleges to be focused and independent. The faith in the ability of women enables a high level of participation in and out of the classroom and takes learning to greater heights. The challenge of holding every leadership position allows you active responsibility in supporting the causes in which you believe, including the shaping of your own education. This real life experience builds critical thinking skills and life-long confidence.

Women's college graduates:

  • Earn an average of $8,000 more per year than women who graduated from coed colleges.
  • Are more than twice as likely to receive a Ph.D.
  • Are more likely to enter male-dominated fields such as math, science or business
  • Represent 30% of Business Week's list of rising stars in corporate America; 33% of female board members of Fortune 1000 companies; and 20% of women in Congress (despite the fact that women's colleges graduate fewer than 2% of college-educated women)
  • Number among their ranks these notable women: former Secretary of State Madeline Albright; Elizabeth Pfohl Campbell, first woman founder of a PBS television station; conservationist, scientist and author of "Silent Spring," Rachel Carson; Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton; Diane Dailey, head coach of women's golf at Wake Forest University, former LPGA Coach of the Year and National Golf Coaches Association Hall of Fame member; Sarah Fulcher, first woman and only third person to complete 2,700 mile run across Australia; actress Katharine Hepburn, first and only person to have won four Academy Awards for acting; Katherine Holland-Ortiz, executive manager of UNICEF; Keesa Schreane, vice president for global markets, equities and structured products marketing at Bank of America Merrill Lynch in New York City; Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker; Barbara Walters, first woman to anchor the network nightly news; and Celia Weston, highly acclaimed actress in the films "The Village," "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days" and "Junebug" and in the TV series "Desperate Housewives."
Names in italics are Salem College Alumnae. Information contributed by the Coalition of Women's Colleges.

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