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Teaching, Schools and Society

ProfessorDavisPhotos-Mark.jpgTeaching is most definitely an art. At Salem, women (traditional-age, Fleer, and graduate level) and men (Fleer and graduate-level) are looking to become educational leaders of tomorrow learn the art of teaching through a careful and intentional blend of course work and multiple field-based experiences. Through it all, they enjoy a close and collaborative learning environment.

Your Program 

Education 4-Year Plan
The Teaching, Schools and Society major offers students several interdisciplinary concentrations blending broad areas of study and foundational education classes: Advocacy (public policy, history, sociology and psychology), Math (multiple math strands), Environment (biology, environmental sciences and policy), Literacy (English, creative writing), Natural Sciences (bio, chemistry, physics and earth science) and Social Sciences (history, sociology, economics and political science).  Along with focusing on a specific area, Teaching, Schools, and Society "situates" each concentration within the figured world of school and schooling. 

Your Faculty 

The Teaching, Schools and Society major is truly interdisciplinary, though it is housed in the education department. Depending on your choice of concentration, you will work with faculty across several departments at Salem College including: arts management and not-for-profit management; English and creative writing; education; policy, politics and public service; mathematics; psychology; sciences (biology, chemistry, environmental studies, and physics); and sociology.

Your Results 

When you graduate from this program, you'll have a broad understanding of the societal context in which twenty-first century schools operate.  More importantly, you will be equipped to serve as a change agent in that setting and be committed to promoting equitable educational opportunities for all learners.

Each concentration has four core Education courses that are required for completion of the major. They can be found on the “Courses” tab.

Advocacy Concentration

A concentration in Advocacy, within the Teaching, Schools and Society major, incorporates courses such as Public Policy, Psychology, Sociology and a choice from several History courses like Native American History, African History, American Women‘s History and many more. This concentration is designed so that teacher candidates can develop an awareness of schooling in the larger social context that surrounds it and can serve as advocates for the student populations they will serve.  It pairs readily with teacher licensure, particularly that for elementary education (K-6) or general curriculum special education. For more information about the teacher licensure curricula,  please click on the Teacher Licensure link on the Undergraduate Programs page.

Environment Concentration

A concentration in Environment, within the Teaching, Schools and Society major, incorporates courses such as Ecology, Earth Sciences, Biodiversity, Environmental Studies and many more. This concentration is designed to prepare teachers who are knowledgeable about the environment and sustainability, and it may be a good choice for those wanting to work in an environmental center or camp, a children’s museum, or a “green school.”   It pairs readily with teacher licensure, particularly that for elementary education (K-6) or general curriculum special education. For more information about the teacher licensure curricula,  please click on the Teacher Licensure link on the Undergraduate Programs page.

Literacy Concentration

A concentration in Literacy, within the Teaching, Schools and Society major, incorporates several courses from English and Creative Writing. Some of these courses include Global Literature, Multi-Cultural Literature in the United States, The Rise of the Female Novelist and many others. This concentration is designed for teacher candidates who who are eager to share a passion for literature and writing with the students that they teach.   It pairs readily with teacher licensure, particularly that for elementary education (K-6) or general curriculum special education. For more information about the teacher licensure curricula,  please click on the Teacher Licensure link on the Undergraduate Programs page.

Mathematics Concentration

A concentration in Mathematics, within the Teaching, Schools and Society major, incorporates several Math courses such as Modern Algebra, Calculus 1 & 2, Probability College Geometry and many more. This concentration is designed to enhance teacher candidates’ understandings so that they can empower their future students mathematically!  It pairs readily with teacher licensure, particularly that for elementary education (K-6) or general curriculum special education. For more information about the teacher licensure curricula,  please click on the Teacher Licensure link on the Undergraduate Programs page.

Natural Sciences Concentration

A concentration in Natural Sciences, within the Teaching, Schools and Society major, incorporates courses such as Biodiversity, General Chemistry, General Physics, Earth Sciences, and several other. This concentration enables teacher candidates with an interest in science to pursue coursework across the general science areas presented within K-12 curricula. It pairs readily with teacher licensure, particularly that for elementary education (K-6) or general curriculum special education. For more information about the teacher licensure curricula,  please click on the Teacher Licensure link on the Undergraduate Programs page.

Social Sciences Concentration

A concentration in Social Sciences, within the Teaching, Schools and Society major, incorporates courses such as World History 1 & 2, United States History to 1877, International Political Geography, Principles of Economics and others. This concentration provides teacher candidates with a broad understanding of the social science content strands presented within K-12 curricula. It pairs readily with teacher licensure, particularly that for elementary education (K-6) or general curriculum special education. For more information about the teacher licensure curricula,  please click on the Teacher Licensure link on the Undergraduate Programs page.

Core Courses for TSS

EDUC 110. 21st Century Teaching and Learning                One course

This course overviews the kinds of distinct characteristics that distinguish 21st century learning including: instructional technology applications and skills in authentic performance-based context (including the most updated NETS standards); the Framework for 21st Century Learning and the updated NC Professional Teaching Standards; professional organizations and professional development; academic reading and writing; and electronic portfolio creation and use. (blocked with EDUC 112). Fall, Spring, Summer.

EDUC 112. Historical and Social Foundations of Education                One course

This course overviews the historical and philosophical bases for educational practice.  Candidates will reflect upon, analyze and evaluate their ideas about teaching and learning in light of personal context, philosophical stances and theoretical ideals.  Educational issues of social justice and equity will be examined from a constructivist perspective.  Reflective journals, case studies and significant field experience will be utilized (blocked with EDUC 110).  Fall, Spring, Summer.

EDUC 120. Text in Context                One course

This course introduces students to genres of fiction and non-fiction, text selection for guided and independent reading and the integration of trade books in units/lessons of study across the content areas. Criteria for evaluating children’s or adolescent literature and matching learners to text are stressed.  EDUC 120 is blocked with EDUC 122.  Fall and Spring.

EDUC 122. Learners in Context One course

This course introduces diversity issues and potential implications for 21st century teaching and learning.  After an exploration of their personal cultural context, students will explore diversity issues of race/ethnicity, language, gender, socio-economic status, age and development, exceptionalities, religions and family/community structures.  Field experiences will connect culturally-responsive teaching practices with various aspects of diversity.  Students will also be introduced to School Improvement Profiles (SIP) and the interdependency of context and SIP relevance.  EDUC 122 is blocked with EDUC 120. Fall, Jan Term, Spring, Summer.

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