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Teacher Licensure

Teaching is most definitely an art. At Salem, women (undergraduate) and men and women (graduate-level) looking to become educational leaders of tomorrow learn the art of teaching through a careful and intentional blend of course work and multiple field-based experiences.

Dr. Susan GebhardTeaching is most definitely an art. At Salem, women (undergraduate) and men and women (graduate-level) looking to become educational leaders of tomorrow learn the art of teaching through a careful and intentional blend of course work and multiple field-based experiences. And through it all, they enjoy a close and collaborative learning environment.

Your Program

Education 4-Year Plan
The Teacher Education Program is a licensure-only program, which enables you to expand your knowledge in another discipline, as well as seek licensure to teach. This structure not only distinguishes our program from others, it also reinforces our heritage and belief in the liberal arts. As 21st-century education is a dynamic field, so is our program.

Your Experience

You will join students in the program who study at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Regardless of where you are on your educational journey, you will work together, leaning on one another and challenging yourselves on a daily basis. As a member of the education-licensure program you will be capable of balancing theory and practice in the dynamic classroom environment, as well as an effective communicator who brings a passion for working with students and their families.

During your course of study, you will complete a required internship in your field as well as a research project. You will have the opportunity to participate in a student club (The Johann Comenius Chapter of the Student National Education Association) as well as the Kappa Delta Pi honor society.

Your Faculty

Professors in the program truly believe that learners construct knowledge and that teachers, as a result, are responsible for creating the conditions of learning. They understand the value of an education at a women's college, believe in being mentors to their students, have demonstrated excellence as public school educators and are widely respected as leaders in the field of education.

Your Results

When you graduate from this program, you will be equipped and ready to teach a diverse range of students in a P-12 school setting; able to serve as a change-agent in that setting; and committed to promoting heightened educational opportunities for young girls, especially in the fields of science and math.

Teacher Licensure for Elementary (K-6) or General Curriculum Special Education (grades K-12)

Candidates wishing to obtain licensure for elementary education (K-6) or general curriculum special education (K-12) may currently select any major offered by Salem College and pursue licensure coursework as well.  Students wishing to obtain teacher licensure for elementary or special education are advised to complete the following professional studies curriculum, including the Teachers as Practitioners semester (student teaching) in addition to one of the interdisciplinary concentrations in the Teaching, Schools and Society major. To ensure satisfactory progress, elementary and special education licensure candidates should seek advising from the Director of Teacher Education or an advisor in the Teacher Education Department as early as possible in their academic programs.

Teacher Licensure for Candidates in Middle School (grades 6-8) Secondary (9-12) Content Areas, Art (K-12) and Second Language (grades K-12)

Candidates wishing to teach middle (6-8) or secondary (9-12) content, art (K-12), or second language (French or Spanish) currently major in the discipline they plan to teach: art (licensure concentration) for art; English for language arts; biology or chemistry for science; economics, history, international relations, psychology or sociology for social sciences; mathematics for math; music (B.A., with licensure concentration) for music; or French or Spanish for second language.  Candidates should seek advising from the program coordinator or the Director of Teacher Education as early as possible in their degree programs.

To obtain a middle/secondary grades teaching license, candidates are required to demonstrate content-area competencies equivalent to a major in the area in which licensure is sought.  If a student establishes proficiency or otherwise demonstrates competency in any of the major content requirements, required courses may be adjusted.

Education Courses (EDUC)

110. 21st Century Teaching and Learning One course

This course overviews the kinds of distinct characteristics that distinguish 21st century learning including: instructional technology applications and skills in authentic performance-based context (including the most updated NETS standards); the Framework for 21st Century Learning and the updated NC Professional Teaching Standards; professional organizations and professional development; academic reading and writing; and electronic portfolio creation and use. (blocked with EDUC 112). Fall and Spring.

112. Historical and Social Foundations of Education One course

This course overviews the historical and philosophical bases for educational practice. Candidates will reflect upon, analyze and evaluate their ideas about teaching and learning in light of personal context, philosophical stances and theoretical ideals. Educational issues of social justice and equity will be examined from a constructivist perspective. Reflective journals, case studies and significant field experience will be utilized (blocked with EDUC 110). Fall and Spring.

120. Text in Context One course

This course introduces students to genres of fiction and non-fiction, text selection for guided and independent reading and the integration of trade books in units/lessons of study across the content areas. Criteria for evaluating children’s or adolescent literature and matching learners to text are stressed. EDUC 120 is blocked with EDUC 122. Fall and Spring.

122. Learners in Context One course

This course introduces diversity issues and potential implications for 21st century teaching and learning. After an exploration of their personal cultural context, students will explore diversity issues of race/ethnicity, language, gender, socio-economic status, age and development, exceptionalities, religions and family/community structures. Field experiences will connect culturally-responsive teaching practices with various aspects of diversity. Students will also be introduced to School Improvement Profiles (SIP) and the interdependency of context and SIP relevance. EDUC 122 is blocked with EDUC 120. Fall and Spring.

200. Self-Directed Inquiry One course

Independent study. Candidates must select a topic and complete a self-directed inquiry form in consultation with the specialty program advisor. Proposal form required prior to registration.

220. Contemporary Issues in Education One-half to one course

This course explores a topic or interrelated topics relevant to 21st century education. Course content will be determined by current social, political, technological or pedagogical developments in education.

330. Instructional Design One course

This course introduces students to instructional design models, curriculum development and assessment (formative, summative and performance) beginning at the specific lesson-plan level and expanding to unit plan then to courses of study. Instructional design and delivery will be explored from the constructivist perspective. Various curriculum models will be presented and the difference between accommodation and instructional planning with intentional differentiation strategies will be stressed. Additionally, the course will focus on strategies for managing the effective learning environment and for integrating content across subject areas and the arts. Each candidate will plan and construct an instructional unit specific to their area of teaching specialty EDUC 330 is blocked with EDUC 332. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall and Spring.

332. Development and Cognition One course

The aim of the course is to prepare students to work with a wide range of individual student differences in skills, motivation, experience and affect. This course introduces candidates to research-based ideas about human physical development and learning domains – cognitive, affective and psychomotor. Concepts regarding human development learning theories will be linked to their implications for classroom management, differentiation, instructional design/delivery and assessment. EDUC 332 is blocked with EDUC 330. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall, Spring and Summer.

333. Comparative Educational Studies One course

This course encourages candidates to make basic comparisons of educational issues between education in the United States and internationally. By reflecting on their own educational experiences, students will think critically about core global issues in education and engage with current comparative research. Significant field experiences in diverse social and educational settings will be required. Study abroad possible. Admission to Teacher Education required. January and Summer.

334. Introduction to Exceptionalities One course

This course presents an historical and philosophical overview of education for exceptional learners including ways in which cultural, socio-economic and family dynamics of exceptional students impact educational planning and instructional delivery. Candidates will explore current legislation and court cases involving exceptionalities, school-based services, placements and methods for students with special needs, and collaborative strategies for families, school personnel and community agencies designed to accommodate students’ needs. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

355. Primary Literacy One course

This course provides a developmental introduction to literacy foundations for learners in the primary grades (K-2). Includes concepts regarding content, instruction and assessment of 21st century literacy strands including: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and visually representing. Candidates will be introduced to various literacy standards from the North Carolina Standard Course of Study (NCSOS), the International Reading Association (IRA) and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) to enable them to develop print-rich primary classroom environments and to teach and support emerging and early readers’ efficient use of cuing strategies, fluency and comprehension. EDUC 355 is a prerequisite for EDUC 356. Case studies, professional research and writing and field experience are required. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

356. Intermediate Literacy One course

This course provides an introduction to literacy for learners in the intermediate grades (3-6). Includes concepts regarding content, instruction, and assessment of 21st century literacy strands including: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and visually representing. Candidates will explore various literacy standards from the North Carolina Standard Course of Study (NCSOS), the International Reading Association (IRA), and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) to develop instructional and management strategies to support increasingly sophisticated cuing systems, writing mechanics, word origins, vocabulary development, grammatical structures and reading and writing in the content-areas. Strategies for the North Carolina End of Grade Tests will be reviewed. Case studies, professional research and writing and field experience are required. Prerequisite: EDUC 355. Admission to Teacher Education required. Spring.

368. Adolescent Pedagogy One course

This course presents concepts, theories, research and best practices related to adolescent development and learning. Candidates will be introduced to curricular practices and instructional and collaborative strategies appropriate to middle-grade learners. Case studies, professional research and writing and field experience are required. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

370. Integrated Math One course

This course presents constructivist instructional strategies, use of developmentally appropriate materials for facilitating learners’ understanding of mathematical concepts and strategies for integrating math across the elementary curriculum. Math standards from the North Carolina Standard Course of Study (NCSOS) and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) will be introduced. Candidates will examine and practice methods to impact diverse students and to use calculators and computers to enhance their understandings. The course includes ongoing assessment methods and strategies for the North Carolina End of Grade Tests. Case studies, professional research and writing and field experience are required. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

372. Integrated Content Areas One course

This course will utilize cooperative learning, brain-compatible instructional theories and technology to introduce candidates to applications and strategies for teaching science, social studies and health that are integrated across the curriculum. Instructional units will be correlated with standards from the North Carolina Standard Course of Study (NCSOS), the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS). Strategies to assist learners with standardized tests in the content areas will be presented. Case studies, professional research and writing and field experience are required. Admission to Teacher Education required. Spring.

375. English in the MS/HS One course

Curriculum, methods and assessment for teaching English in the middle and secondary grades. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

376. Foreign Language in the MS/HS One course

Instructional techniques, materials and resources for teaching foreign languages in grades K through 12. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

377. Math in the MS/HS One course

Curriculum, methods and assessment for teaching mathematics in the middle and secondary grades. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

378. Science in the MS/HS One course

Curriculum, methods and assessment for teaching science in the middle and secondary grades. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

379. Social Studies in the MS/HS One course

Curriculum, methods and assessment for teaching social studies in the middle and secondary grades. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

380. Exceptional Students – Exceptional Qualities One course

This course overviews the legal, historical and medical foundations regarding exceptional students including learning disabilities (LD), behavioral/ emotional disabilities (BED) and mild mental disabilities (MMR). EDUC 380 is a prerequisite to EDUC 381. Case studies, professional research and writing and field experience are required. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

381. Exceptional Students – Exceptional Strategies One course

This course presents a study of current trends, instructional strategies, and individual educational plans (IEPs). Candidates will compare and contrast inclusive or co-teaching service models, identify strategies for accommodation and differentiation and screening/evaluation procedures. Case studies, professional research and writing and field experience are required. Prerequisite: EDUC 380. Admission to Teacher Education required. Spring.

383. Teaching Art in the K-12 School One course

Curriculum, methods, and assessment for teaching art in kindergarten through grade 12. Admission to teacher education required. Fall.

384. Teaching Music in the K-12 School One course

Curriculum, methods, and assessment for teaching music in kindergarten through grade 12. Admission to teacher education required. Fall.

385. Teaching Content in the MS/HS One course

Curriculum, methods and assessment for teaching integrated content areas in the middle and secondary grades. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall.

394. Teachers as Practitioners – Seminar One course

This seminar accompanies the supervised internship (student teaching). Reflective practice, collaboration, professional readings and speakers and collegial discussion will be used to address contemporary issues in education and with regards to candidates’ practices. Candidates must register for both EDUC 394 and EDUC 399 in the same semester. Admission to Teacher Education required. Graded pass/no credit. Fall and Spring.

399. Teachers as Practitioners Two courses

Supervised internship (student teaching). Required for all initial licensure candidates. Candidates must register for both EDUC 394 and EDUC 399 in the same pass/no credit. Admission to Teacher Education required. Fall and Spring.