Choosing a biology major or minor gives a whole new meaning to preparing yourself for “real life.” Students may also take advantage of the programs offered by the unique Women in Science and Mathematics Program, including lectures, special study, and research opportunities.

Biology is the study of life. This broad definition encompasses many different independent disciplines from the study of cells and molecular biology to the study of communities and evolutionary biology. We provide our students with a solid foundation of all the fundamental fields in biology producing well-rounded scientists grounded in the liberal arts. We believe that doing science is vital to learning and to loving science. Most of our courses have accompanying laboratories with onsite faculty right there with the students using up-to-date equipment in state-of-the-art laboratories. Our students are well prepared to take this knowledge gained in the classroom to their internships where they gain real world experience. When our students graduate we expect them to have excellent quantitative skills, writing and communication skills, and skills in scientific methodology, critical thinking, and analysis which prepares them well for continuing on with their education in graduate or professional schools or for entering the workforce.

Overview

Your Program

The study of biological sciences will enable you to better understand the living world of which you are a part and secure a scientific knowledge of the fundamental facts and concepts concerning living organisms, including bacteria, viruses, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. 

  • The Biology Major (BS)
    Students seeking the bachelor of science degree with a major in biology must complete a minimum of seventeen courses, including ten biology courses.
  • The Biology Major (BA)
    Students seeking the bachelor of arts degree with a major in biology must complete eleven courses, including eight biology courses. 

Your Commitment

You will join a diverse group of biology students, hailing from places as far away as Nepal and as close by as Mocksville, NC. Some students join the Biology Department because they want to be doctors. Others join because they're passionate about environmental science and evolution. Still others become involved because they're interested in medical technology. Whatever reason you have for joining the department, you will share with your peers a set of academic goals: to engage in scientific research, to work closely with faculty who share your passion for science, and to make a difference in their world, wherever you live. It's this kind of drive and enthusiasm for science that we invite you to experience at Salem.

Your Faculty

The diverse interests of the biology faculty provide you with a rigorous, well-rounded program of biological sciences. The high caliber of the Biology Program courses means that you are likely to join other Salem students in performing well above average on the standardized Biology Major Field Test and earning exceptionally positive reviews from the off-campus supervisors of your internships.

Your Experience

You will be encouraged to engage in scholarly activities outside of the classroom. Our Alpha Beta chapter of Beta Beta Beta, the biological honor society, promotes and rewards excellence among our undergraduates. Top-performing biology students have consistently been active participants of the Lehman Scholars program. Faculty and students work together to arrange professional January Term and summer internships in which you will experience first-hand a job or research opportunity of interest to you. Although Salem College requires only one professional internship for completion of a bachelor's degree, you may choose, as do many biology students, to take part in multiple internships during your time here. When you graduate, you will have excellent quantitative skills, writing and communication skills, and skills in scientific methodology, critical thinking, and analysis, all of which will prepare you well for continuing on with your education in graduate or professional schools or for entering the workforce.

Major/Minor

Biology Major (BA)

The student who seeks the bachelor of arts degree with a major in biology must complete eleven courses, including eight biology courses. At least four of the eight biology courses required for the major (BA) must be taken at Salem.

Required Courses

  • BIOL 100. Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 101. Biodiversity (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 205. Biometry (4 hrs)*
  • BIOL 210. Ecology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 310. Advanced Genetics (5 hrs)
  • BIOL 311. Evolution (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 390. Senior Seminar (3 hrs)
  • CHEM 110. General Chemistry (5 hrs)
  • CHEM 120. General Chemistry with Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis (5 hrs)
  • MATH 070. Essential Calculus or higher (3-5 hrs)

Select one additional biology elective (3-5 hrs)

*An equivalent statistics course may be substituted for BIOL 205 with permission of the biology department chair.


Biology Major (BS)

The student who seeks the bachelor of science degree with a major in biology must complete a minimum of seventeen courses, including ten biology courses.

Required Courses:

  • BIOL 100. Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 101. Biodiversity(4 hrs)
  • BIOL 205. Biometry (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 210. Ecology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 310. Advanced Genetics (5 hrs)
  • BIOL 311. Evolution (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 390. Senior Seminar (3 hrs)
  • CHEM 110. General Chemistry (5 hrs)
  • CHEM 120. General Chemistry with Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis (5 hrs)
  • CHEM 201. Organic Chemistry I (5 hrs)
  • CHEM 202. Organic Chemistry II (5 hrs)
  • MATH 100. Calculus I or higher (3-5 hrs)
  • PHYS 210. General Physics I (5 hrs)
  • PHYS 220. General Physics II (5 hrs)

Three biology elective courses for a minimum of 9 hours.

At least five of the ten biology courses required for the major (BS) must be taken at Salem.

A student intending to be a BS biology major should meet with her advisor early and regularly to discuss a suggested program of study in order to remain on track for graduation within four years.

All students planning a major in biology are expected to finish their mathematics requirements by the end of their first year. Entering students who are confident in their quantitative skills are advised to take general chemistry (CHEM 110) and BIOL 100 & 101 in their first year. Students who have not had pre- calculus may consider taking CHEM 110 in their second year. BIOL 205 (or an equivalent course in statistics), 210 and 310 should be completed by the end of their junior year. The electives BIOL 235 and 218/219 are recommended for the junior or senior year. Most other electives are appropriate for students in their sophomore through senior years. BIOL 311 and 390 are capstone courses required in the senior year.


Biology Minor

The minor in biology requires the completion of five courses:

Required Courses:

  • BIOL 100. Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 101. Biodiversity (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 210. Ecology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 310. Advanced Genetics (5 hrs)

Select one additional biology elective (3-5 hrs)

All courses must be taken at Salem or Wake Forest. A transfer student may submit the equivalent of up to two of the following courses for credit toward the minor: BIOL 100, 101 or one biology elective.

Senior Evaluation for Majors (BA and BS)

The department of biology evaluates the performance of its seniors with key components of the curriculum. BIOL 390 (Senior Seminar) requires students to give a major presentation and paper on a current biological topic that requires an integration of the knowledge acquired in the biology core curriculum. In addition, the department requires all seniors to take the Major Field Test in Biology while enrolled in BIOL 390. The tests are designed and evaluated by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). 

Courses

Biology Courses (BIOL)

BIOL 010. Principles of Biology (4 hrs)

An introductory course in biological science for non-majors. Emphasis is on general principles, including the scientific method, biochemistry, cytology, metabolism, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell division, classical and molecular genetics, evolution, and ecology. This course will not substitute for any biology course for majors in biology. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory. (LS)

BIOL 070. Issues in Biology for Women (3 hrs)

The major emphasis of this course will be placed on the scientific principles behind many issues directly related to women’s lives. Designed for non-majors, this course will use a feminist critical analysis of basic biological issues in genetics, molecular biology, and health, and interactions between biology and society. This course will not count toward a major or minor in biology. Fulfills the Women’s Studies and Quantitative Interpretation requirements for the Salem Signature Liberal Arts Interdisciplinary Dimensions. (WS, QI)

BIOL 100. Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hrs)

The structure and function of cells. An examination of the cell’s microscopic and ultrastructural features, physiological capabilities, and biochemical properties, including such topics as membrane and organelle formation, DNA replication, transcription, translation, cellular metabolism, cell division, cell differentiation, and cell communication. This is the required introductory course for majors in biology and exercise science and is a prerequisite for all other majors-level biology courses. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: Placement above MATH 020. (LS)

BIOL 101. Biodiversity (4 hrs)

Introduction to the evolution and diversity of the forms and functions of organisms including bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, with a special emphasis on plants and animals. Laboratory techniques include microscopy and dissection. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or both BIOL 010 and ENVS 100, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 114. General Botany (4 hrs)

The course covers the distinguishing characteristics of major plant families, evolutionary relationships between major plant groups, how to use botanical keys, and the dominant and identifying species within local habitat communities. Students will also learn how to use herbaria and how to prepare specimen for storage within them. During lab, students will learn how to identify common and habitat-specific plant species of the Southeastern United States. The course is primarily a field course so students must expect to be outside every week. On several occasions during the semester, the lecture and lab sections of the class will meet in one continuous session to enable exploration of more remote vegetation communities. Two lectures, one three-hour lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 180. Animal Behavior (4 hrs)

Exploration of the mechanisms, development, evolution, and adaptive functions of naturally-occurring behavior in animals, with an emphasis on vertebrates in the wild. Topics include learning, feeding, avoiding predators, reproduction, and social organization. Lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Cross-listed with PSYC 180. Prerequisites: Either BIOL 010, BIOL 100, or PSYC 010. 

BIOL 200. Independent Study in Biology (1-4 hrs)

Independent study under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Open to students with a 2.0 cumulative average and permission of the chair of department. Independent study may take the form of readings, research, conference, project, and/or field experience. Independent study may be taken for a maximum of eight hours, the maximum in any one term being eight hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 and 101; MATH 025, 070 or higher; or permission of instructor.

BIOL 205. Biometry (4 hrs)

Introduction to the theory and application of descriptive and inferential statistical methods used in the life sciences. Includes training in computer-assisted analysis. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory/discussion session per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or both BIOL 010 and ENVS 100; MATH 025, 070 or higher; or permission of instructor. (QI)

BIOL 210. Ecology (4 hrs)

The principles underlying the interrelations of organisms with their environments, including the population, community, ecosystem, and biosphere levels of organization. The laboratory is closely integrated with the lecture and includes studies of the different levels of integration. Two lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 010 or 100, and 101; or permission of instructor.

BIOL 212. Plant Taxonomy (4 hrs)

The morphology, classification, nomenclature, and systematics of the seed plants with emphasis upon orders and families. The laboratory stresses the collection and identification of specimens from the local spring flora. Field trips are taken to the different vegetative provinces of the Carolinas, including the seashore and mountains. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or permission of instructor. 

BIOL 215. Developmental Biology (4 hrs)

Developmental biology incorporates the study of the transformation of a single cell into an adult organism and the underlying causes of what makes living things become different. We will explore the central concepts of the development of an individual and the role development plays in the evolution of organisms by using primarily vertebrate and invertebrate animal model systems to study classical embryology and the underlying molecular mechanisms of development. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory/discussion session per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or permission of instructor. 

BIOL 218. Anatomy and Physiology I (5 hrs)

The first of a two-course sequence in basic human anatomy and physiology. Beginning with a review of biochemistry, cytology, and cellular metabolism, this first course then emphasizes the structure and function at the gross, histologic, and ultrastructural levels of the integumentary, skeletal, articular, muscular, and nervous systems. Anatomy by dissection and experimental concepts of physiology are studied in the laboratory. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 and 101 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 219. Anatomy and Physiology II (5 hrs)

The continuation of a two-course sequence in basic human anatomy and physiology. Emphasis on the structure and function of the cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Anatomy by dissection and experimental concepts of physiology are studied in the laboratory. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 218.

BIOL 220. Special Topics in Biology (1-4 hrs)

An investigation of a topic of importance in contemporary biology. The specific course content and methods of study will vary in response to recent developments in the life sciences and current needs of students majoring in biology; the topic will be announced prior to registration for the course. Three lecture/discussions, one three-hour laboratory or field experience. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 235. Microbiology (4 hrs)

A systematic study of the more important groups of microorganisms: the bacteria, yeasts, molds, cyanobacteria, rickettsiae, viruses, and protozoa. Emphasis is given to morphology, taxonomy, and activities of selected members of each group, including topics on control of microorganisms, disease relationships, and applied microbiology. Three lectures, two two-hour laboratories. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 and 210; CHEM 201 and 202; or permission of instructor.

BIOL 240. Research Methods (4 hrs)

This course is designed to teach students how to properly carry out the scientific method in terms of designing, executing, and evaluating a plan of action in scientific research. Methodologies utilized in the course will come from a broad range of disciplines within the biological and environmental sciences. Students will also learn to properly analyze, critique, and present the data they generate. Communication-intensive. These topics will be covered in weekly lectures and a three-hour lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 and 101; or permission of instructor. 

BIOL 260. Conservation Biology (3 hrs)

This course will examine human impacts on biological diversity, explore how conservation science can be used to ameliorate these impacts and inform land management decisions, and investigate the interaction between conservation science and public policy and assess the effectiveness of different approaches in reaching conservation goals. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 270. Internship in Biology (1-5 hrs)

An opportunity to use the knowledge and skills the student has learned in coursework to solve problems in a real work setting. The apprenticeship aspect of the internship implies that the student has some base of knowledge and will increase her knowledge and skills by direct contact with an experienced, knowledgeable mentor. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with at least a 2.0 cumulative average; maximum credit per term is five semester hours; admission by application only.

BIOL 280. Immunology (3 hrs)

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the human immune system. Emphasis will be placed on topics such as the development and anatomy of the immune system, characterization of white blood cells, recognition and defense against infection, and disorders of the immune system, including autoimmune diseases, immunodeficiencies, and cancer. These topics will be addressed in weekly lectures. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 and BIOL 101, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 290. Honors Independent Study in Biology (3-4 hrs)

Advanced independent study under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Normally open to junior and senior biology majors with a 3.5 or greater average in biology, subject to the approval of the department chair. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 and 101; MATH 070 or higher. Honors independent study may be taken for a total maximum of eight hours, the maximum in any one term being eight hours.

BIOL 310. Advanced Genetics (5 hours)

Advanced problem solving in transmission genetics, molecular genetics, and biotechnology. The laboratory uses current methodologies and consists of experiments in classical genetics, molecular biology, and bioinformatics. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 and BIOL 101; MATH 100 or C- or better in MATH 070; junior standing as a science or mathematics major or permission of instructor. Course in statistics strongly recommended.

BIOL 311. Evolution (4 hrs)

A study of the historical aspects of the theory of evolution, including a critical analysis of The Origin of Species, and an understanding of the modern theory with emphasis on current experimentation. Writing-intensive. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 210 and 310, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 390. Senior Seminar (3 hrs)

Fundamental problems in the biological sciences with emphasis on current research. Students will write a literature review based on a biological question and will present their findings to the class. Open only to seniors for credit, but sophomores and juniors are encouraged to attend the seminars. Writing-intensive. Prerequisites: BIOL 311 or permission of instructor.

Internships

Mayo Clinic's College of Medicine

NSF REU grant - Dr. Cruse-Sanders

Biomedical Research at the Medical College of Georgia

Norfolk State University

Earth Systems Research Lab, University of Colorado

Wake Forest University's Department of Chemistry

Sea Lab internship on Dauphin Island, Alabama

National Textile Center research program at NC State University

HHMI Scholarships through NC State University and Salem College

WFUBMC-NC Biotechnology Center scholarships w/ Salem College

Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, CA

Tyson Foods in Wilkesboro - Quality Assurance Department

Lipid Sciences Research Department at Wake Forest Univiversity Health Sciences

Targacept Inc, Winston-Salem, NC

Success Stories
The personal investment of professors at Salem helped me to find the right path for the next stage of my life. I have a full fellowship at UNC to pay for tuition with a stipend for personal expenses as I study towards my PhD. I competed for my position with students and professionals from across the globe, and what truly made me stand out was my extensive research experience and individualized personal recommendation letters.
Jessica Bullins

Class Year:

2013
 

Majors:

Biology and chemistry
 

Internships and research:

  • January Term research at a regenerative medicine company in Winston-Salem
  • Two paid summer internships studying eating behavior in adults which resulted in my first scientific publication
 

Study Abroad:

A semester in England
 

Graduate Studies:

UNC Neurobiology National Institute of Health Training Fellowship, which covers tuition and personal expenses while completing the PhD program in neurobiology at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
 
 

Your Program

The study of biological sciences will enable you to better understand the living world of which you are a part and secure a scientific knowledge of the fundamental facts and concepts concerning living organisms, including bacteria, viruses, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. 

  • The Biology Major (BS)
    Students seeking the bachelor of science degree with a major in biology must complete a minimum of seventeen courses, including ten biology courses.
  • The Biology Major (BA)
    Students seeking the bachelor of arts degree with a major in biology must complete eleven courses, including eight biology courses. 

Your Commitment

You will join a diverse group of biology students, hailing from places as far away as Nepal and as close by as Mocksville, NC. Some students join the Biology Department because they want to be doctors. Others join because they're passionate about environmental science and evolution. Still others become involved because they're interested in medical technology. Whatever reason you have for joining the department, you will share with your peers a set of academic goals: to engage in scientific research, to work closely with faculty who share your passion for science, and to make a difference in their world, wherever you live. It's this kind of drive and enthusiasm for science that we invite you to experience at Salem.

Your Faculty

The diverse interests of the biology faculty provide you with a rigorous, well-rounded program of biological sciences. The high caliber of the Biology Program courses means that you are likely to join other Salem students in performing well above average on the standardized Biology Major Field Test and earning exceptionally positive reviews from the off-campus supervisors of your internships.

Your Experience

You will be encouraged to engage in scholarly activities outside of the classroom. Our Alpha Beta chapter of Beta Beta Beta, the biological honor society, promotes and rewards excellence among our undergraduates. Top-performing biology students have consistently been active participants of the Lehman Scholars program. Faculty and students work together to arrange professional January Term and summer internships in which you will experience first-hand a job or research opportunity of interest to you. Although Salem College requires only one professional internship for completion of a bachelor's degree, you may choose, as do many biology students, to take part in multiple internships during your time here. When you graduate, you will have excellent quantitative skills, writing and communication skills, and skills in scientific methodology, critical thinking, and analysis, all of which will prepare you well for continuing on with your education in graduate or professional schools or for entering the workforce.

Biology Major (BA)

The student who seeks the bachelor of arts degree with a major in biology must complete eleven courses, including eight biology courses. At least four of the eight biology courses required for the major (BA) must be taken at Salem.

Required Courses

  • BIOL 100. Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 101. Biodiversity (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 205. Biometry (4 hrs)*
  • BIOL 210. Ecology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 310. Advanced Genetics (5 hrs)
  • BIOL 311. Evolution (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 390. Senior Seminar (3 hrs)
  • CHEM 110. General Chemistry (5 hrs)
  • CHEM 120. General Chemistry with Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis (5 hrs)
  • MATH 070. Essential Calculus or higher (3-5 hrs)

Select one additional biology elective (3-5 hrs)

*An equivalent statistics course may be substituted for BIOL 205 with permission of the biology department chair.


Biology Major (BS)

The student who seeks the bachelor of science degree with a major in biology must complete a minimum of seventeen courses, including ten biology courses.

Required Courses:

  • BIOL 100. Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 101. Biodiversity(4 hrs)
  • BIOL 205. Biometry (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 210. Ecology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 310. Advanced Genetics (5 hrs)
  • BIOL 311. Evolution (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 390. Senior Seminar (3 hrs)
  • CHEM 110. General Chemistry (5 hrs)
  • CHEM 120. General Chemistry with Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis (5 hrs)
  • CHEM 201. Organic Chemistry I (5 hrs)
  • CHEM 202. Organic Chemistry II (5 hrs)
  • MATH 100. Calculus I or higher (3-5 hrs)
  • PHYS 210. General Physics I (5 hrs)
  • PHYS 220. General Physics II (5 hrs)

Three biology elective courses for a minimum of 9 hours.

At least five of the ten biology courses required for the major (BS) must be taken at Salem.

A student intending to be a BS biology major should meet with her advisor early and regularly to discuss a suggested program of study in order to remain on track for graduation within four years.

All students planning a major in biology are expected to finish their mathematics requirements by the end of their first year. Entering students who are confident in their quantitative skills are advised to take general chemistry (CHEM 110) and BIOL 100 & 101 in their first year. Students who have not had pre- calculus may consider taking CHEM 110 in their second year. BIOL 205 (or an equivalent course in statistics), 210 and 310 should be completed by the end of their junior year. The electives BIOL 235 and 218/219 are recommended for the junior or senior year. Most other electives are appropriate for students in their sophomore through senior years. BIOL 311 and 390 are capstone courses required in the senior year.


Biology Minor

The minor in biology requires the completion of five courses:

Required Courses:

  • BIOL 100. Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 101. Biodiversity (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 210. Ecology (4 hrs)
  • BIOL 310. Advanced Genetics (5 hrs)

Select one additional biology elective (3-5 hrs)

All courses must be taken at Salem or Wake Forest. A transfer student may submit the equivalent of up to two of the following courses for credit toward the minor: BIOL 100, 101 or one biology elective.

Senior Evaluation for Majors (BA and BS)

The department of biology evaluates the performance of its seniors with key components of the curriculum. BIOL 390 (Senior Seminar) requires students to give a major presentation and paper on a current biological topic that requires an integration of the knowledge acquired in the biology core curriculum. In addition, the department requires all seniors to take the Major Field Test in Biology while enrolled in BIOL 390. The tests are designed and evaluated by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). 

Biology Courses (BIOL)

BIOL 010. Principles of Biology (4 hrs)

An introductory course in biological science for non-majors. Emphasis is on general principles, including the scientific method, biochemistry, cytology, metabolism, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell division, classical and molecular genetics, evolution, and ecology. This course will not substitute for any biology course for majors in biology. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory. (LS)

BIOL 070. Issues in Biology for Women (3 hrs)

The major emphasis of this course will be placed on the scientific principles behind many issues directly related to women’s lives. Designed for non-majors, this course will use a feminist critical analysis of basic biological issues in genetics, molecular biology, and health, and interactions between biology and society. This course will not count toward a major or minor in biology. Fulfills the Women’s Studies and Quantitative Interpretation requirements for the Salem Signature Liberal Arts Interdisciplinary Dimensions. (WS, QI)

BIOL 100. Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hrs)

The structure and function of cells. An examination of the cell’s microscopic and ultrastructural features, physiological capabilities, and biochemical properties, including such topics as membrane and organelle formation, DNA replication, transcription, translation, cellular metabolism, cell division, cell differentiation, and cell communication. This is the required introductory course for majors in biology and exercise science and is a prerequisite for all other majors-level biology courses. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: Placement above MATH 020. (LS)

BIOL 101. Biodiversity (4 hrs)

Introduction to the evolution and diversity of the forms and functions of organisms including bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, with a special emphasis on plants and animals. Laboratory techniques include microscopy and dissection. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or both BIOL 010 and ENVS 100, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 114. General Botany (4 hrs)

The course covers the distinguishing characteristics of major plant families, evolutionary relationships between major plant groups, how to use botanical keys, and the dominant and identifying species within local habitat communities. Students will also learn how to use herbaria and how to prepare specimen for storage within them. During lab, students will learn how to identify common and habitat-specific plant species of the Southeastern United States. The course is primarily a field course so students must expect to be outside every week. On several occasions during the semester, the lecture and lab sections of the class will meet in one continuous session to enable exploration of more remote vegetation communities. Two lectures, one three-hour lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 180. Animal Behavior (4 hrs)

Exploration of the mechanisms, development, evolution, and adaptive functions of naturally-occurring behavior in animals, with an emphasis on vertebrates in the wild. Topics include learning, feeding, avoiding predators, reproduction, and social organization. Lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Cross-listed with PSYC 180. Prerequisites: Either BIOL 010, BIOL 100, or PSYC 010. 

BIOL 200. Independent Study in Biology (1-4 hrs)

Independent study under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Open to students with a 2.0 cumulative average and permission of the chair of department. Independent study may take the form of readings, research, conference, project, and/or field experience. Independent study may be taken for a maximum of eight hours, the maximum in any one term being eight hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 and 101; MATH 025, 070 or higher; or permission of instructor.

BIOL 205. Biometry (4 hrs)

Introduction to the theory and application of descriptive and inferential statistical methods used in the life sciences. Includes training in computer-assisted analysis. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory/discussion session per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or both BIOL 010 and ENVS 100; MATH 025, 070 or higher; or permission of instructor. (QI)

BIOL 210. Ecology (4 hrs)

The principles underlying the interrelations of organisms with their environments, including the population, community, ecosystem, and biosphere levels of organization. The laboratory is closely integrated with the lecture and includes studies of the different levels of integration. Two lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 010 or 100, and 101; or permission of instructor.

BIOL 212. Plant Taxonomy (4 hrs)

The morphology, classification, nomenclature, and systematics of the seed plants with emphasis upon orders and families. The laboratory stresses the collection and identification of specimens from the local spring flora. Field trips are taken to the different vegetative provinces of the Carolinas, including the seashore and mountains. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or permission of instructor. 

BIOL 215. Developmental Biology (4 hrs)

Developmental biology incorporates the study of the transformation of a single cell into an adult organism and the underlying causes of what makes living things become different. We will explore the central concepts of the development of an individual and the role development plays in the evolution of organisms by using primarily vertebrate and invertebrate animal model systems to study classical embryology and the underlying molecular mechanisms of development. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory/discussion session per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or permission of instructor. 

BIOL 218. Anatomy and Physiology I (5 hrs)

The first of a two-course sequence in basic human anatomy and physiology. Beginning with a review of biochemistry, cytology, and cellular metabolism, this first course then emphasizes the structure and function at the gross, histologic, and ultrastructural levels of the integumentary, skeletal, articular, muscular, and nervous systems. Anatomy by dissection and experimental concepts of physiology are studied in the laboratory. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 and 101 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 219. Anatomy and Physiology II (5 hrs)

The continuation of a two-course sequence in basic human anatomy and physiology. Emphasis on the structure and function of the cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Anatomy by dissection and experimental concepts of physiology are studied in the laboratory. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 218.

BIOL 220. Special Topics in Biology (1-4 hrs)

An investigation of a topic of importance in contemporary biology. The specific course content and methods of study will vary in response to recent developments in the life sciences and current needs of students majoring in biology; the topic will be announced prior to registration for the course. Three lecture/discussions, one three-hour laboratory or field experience. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 235. Microbiology (4 hrs)

A systematic study of the more important groups of microorganisms: the bacteria, yeasts, molds, cyanobacteria, rickettsiae, viruses, and protozoa. Emphasis is given to morphology, taxonomy, and activities of selected members of each group, including topics on control of microorganisms, disease relationships, and applied microbiology. Three lectures, two two-hour laboratories. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 and 210; CHEM 201 and 202; or permission of instructor.

BIOL 240. Research Methods (4 hrs)

This course is designed to teach students how to properly carry out the scientific method in terms of designing, executing, and evaluating a plan of action in scientific research. Methodologies utilized in the course will come from a broad range of disciplines within the biological and environmental sciences. Students will also learn to properly analyze, critique, and present the data they generate. Communication-intensive. These topics will be covered in weekly lectures and a three-hour lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 and 101; or permission of instructor. 

BIOL 260. Conservation Biology (3 hrs)

This course will examine human impacts on biological diversity, explore how conservation science can be used to ameliorate these impacts and inform land management decisions, and investigate the interaction between conservation science and public policy and assess the effectiveness of different approaches in reaching conservation goals. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 270. Internship in Biology (1-5 hrs)

An opportunity to use the knowledge and skills the student has learned in coursework to solve problems in a real work setting. The apprenticeship aspect of the internship implies that the student has some base of knowledge and will increase her knowledge and skills by direct contact with an experienced, knowledgeable mentor. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with at least a 2.0 cumulative average; maximum credit per term is five semester hours; admission by application only.

BIOL 280. Immunology (3 hrs)

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the human immune system. Emphasis will be placed on topics such as the development and anatomy of the immune system, characterization of white blood cells, recognition and defense against infection, and disorders of the immune system, including autoimmune diseases, immunodeficiencies, and cancer. These topics will be addressed in weekly lectures. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 and BIOL 101, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 290. Honors Independent Study in Biology (3-4 hrs)

Advanced independent study under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Normally open to junior and senior biology majors with a 3.5 or greater average in biology, subject to the approval of the department chair. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 and 101; MATH 070 or higher. Honors independent study may be taken for a total maximum of eight hours, the maximum in any one term being eight hours.

BIOL 310. Advanced Genetics (5 hours)

Advanced problem solving in transmission genetics, molecular genetics, and biotechnology. The laboratory uses current methodologies and consists of experiments in classical genetics, molecular biology, and bioinformatics. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 and BIOL 101; MATH 100 or C- or better in MATH 070; junior standing as a science or mathematics major or permission of instructor. Course in statistics strongly recommended.

BIOL 311. Evolution (4 hrs)

A study of the historical aspects of the theory of evolution, including a critical analysis of The Origin of Species, and an understanding of the modern theory with emphasis on current experimentation. Writing-intensive. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 210 and 310, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 390. Senior Seminar (3 hrs)

Fundamental problems in the biological sciences with emphasis on current research. Students will write a literature review based on a biological question and will present their findings to the class. Open only to seniors for credit, but sophomores and juniors are encouraged to attend the seminars. Writing-intensive. Prerequisites: BIOL 311 or permission of instructor.

The personal investment of professors at Salem helped me to find the right path for the next stage of my life. I have a full fellowship at UNC to pay for tuition with a stipend for personal expenses as I study towards my PhD. I competed for my position with students and professionals from across the globe, and what truly made me stand out was my extensive research experience and individualized personal recommendation letters.
Jessica Bullins

Class Year:

2013
 

Majors:

Biology and chemistry
 

Internships and research:

  • January Term research at a regenerative medicine company in Winston-Salem
  • Two paid summer internships studying eating behavior in adults which resulted in my first scientific publication
 

Study Abroad:

A semester in England
 

Graduate Studies:

UNC Neurobiology National Institute of Health Training Fellowship, which covers tuition and personal expenses while completing the PhD program in neurobiology at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
 
 

Mayo Clinic's College of Medicine

NSF REU grant - Dr. Cruse-Sanders

Biomedical Research at the Medical College of Georgia

Norfolk State University

Earth Systems Research Lab, University of Colorado

Wake Forest University's Department of Chemistry

Sea Lab internship on Dauphin Island, Alabama

National Textile Center research program at NC State University

HHMI Scholarships through NC State University and Salem College

WFUBMC-NC Biotechnology Center scholarships w/ Salem College

Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, CA

Tyson Foods in Wilkesboro - Quality Assurance Department

Lipid Sciences Research Department at Wake Forest Univiversity Health Sciences

Targacept Inc, Winston-Salem, NC